Resources

For immediate access to local information and resources, please call 

The United Way Help Line

1-877-211-MASS or 1-877-211-6277

If you are calling from within Massachusetts, you may be able to reach this line by dialing 211.

 

Important Information on Access to Bridge Programs

Almost all Bridge programs require referrals from either The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH), Developmental Disabilities (DDS), Massachusetts Rehab Commission (MRC) or Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (DCF).  This is commonly referred to as a Closed Referral Process. 

We are happy to try to assist you if you feel that you or your loved one could benefit from one of the Bridge services or programs, but please understand that the first step may be for you to determine eligibility for services through one of the funding agencies listed above. 

Examples of programs that do not require referral by  a funder include Safe Homes, The Bridge Training Institute,and The Bridge Trauma Response Service.

 

Suicide Prevention Resources AND INFORMATION

1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

www.suicidology.org

www.qprinstitute.com

www.sprc.org

www.afsp.org

www.bestcolleges.com/resources/suicide-prevention/

 

SUICIDE and SUICIDE PREVENTION

Information compiled from:

American Association of Suicidology

The Suicide Prevention Resource Center

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

The QPR Institute

 

Scope of the problem

Suicide occurs when a person ends his or her life. It is the 10th leading cause of death among Americans. But suicide deaths are only part of the problem.  Suicide attempts impact a larger population—more individuals survive suicide attempts than die. And they are often seriously injured and in need of medical care.

Suicide Deaths in the United States

  • There are far more suicides each year than homicides. In fact, in from 2008 - 2010, the number of suicides has been more than twice that of homicides.
  • In 2010, more than 38,000 people died by suicide.

Suicide Attempts in the United States

  • There are an estimated 12 attempted suicides for every one suicide death.
  • In 2009, there were an estimated 374,486 people with self-inflicted injuries are treated in emergency departments. The number increased to 464,995 in 2010 and 487,770 in 2011.
  • The estimated number of people hospitalized for self-inflicted injuries increased from 155,000 in 2009 to 224,000 in 2011.

Age Group Differences

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 25- to 34-year olds and the third leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year olds.
  • Suicide among 45- to 54-year-olds is a growing problem; the rate of suicide is higher in this age group than in any other.
  • Although older adults engage in suicide attempts less than those in other age groups, they have a higher rate of death by suicide.  Over the age of 65, there is one estimated suicide for every 4 attempted suicides compared to 1 suicide for every 100-200 attempts among youth and young adults ages 15-24.

Gender Disparities

  • Men die by suicide four times as often as women and represent 78.8% of all U.S. suicides.
  • Women attempt suicide two to three times as often as men.
  • Suicide rates for males are highest among those aged 75 and older.
  • Suicide rates for females are highest among those aged 45-54.
  • Firearms are the most commonly used method of suicide among males.
  • Poisoning is the most common method of suicide for females.

Racial and Ethnic Disparities

  • The highest suicide rates are among American Indian/Alaskan Natives and Non-Hispanic Whites.
  • Asian/Pacific Islanders have the lowest suicide rates among males while Non-Hispanic Blacks have the lowest suicide rate among females.

Risk and Protective Factors

Suicide is a complex human behavior, with no single determining cause. The factors that affect the likelihood of a person attempting or dying by are known as risk or protective factors, depending on whether they raise or lower the likelihood of suicidal behavior.

Major risk factors for suicide include:

  • Prior suicide attempt(s)
  • Mood disorders
  • Substance abuse
  • Access to lethal means

Major protective factors include:

  • Effective mental health care
  • Connectedness
  • Problem-solving skills